Comey Agrees to Testify in Open Hearing Before Senate Intel Committee

Comey Agrees to Testify in Open Hearing Before Senate Intel Committee

Comey Agrees to Testify in Open Hearing Before Senate Intel Committee

Ten days after James Comey was sacked by President Donald Trump, the former FBI Director agreed to testify before an open session of the Senate Intel Committee.

The highly anticipated testimony of former FBI Director James Comey was announced by Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard Burr (R-N.C.) Friday. "Moreover, the American people deserve an opportunity to hear it", wrote Warner in a statement.

Comey has been at the center of a series of damaging leaks from the White House since he was sacked on May 9, including reports that Trump asked him to drop an investigation of Russia's ties with former White House aide Michael Flynn during Trump's first weeks in office.

Giving Comey the boot ameliorated "great pressure", Trump told Russian officials during a May 10 meeting in the White House, at least according to a version of the events leaked to the New York Times.

"I just fired the head of the F.B.I. He was insane, a real nut job", Trump said on May 10, according to the newspaper.

Contacted by the Times, White House press secretary Sean Spice did not deny Trump had made the statements, saying Comey's "grandstanding and politicizing" of the Russian Federation probe had put "unnecessary pressure on our ability to engage and negotiate with Russian Federation".

Burr says the committee wants to hear from Comey on his role in the development of the USA intelligence agencies' assessment that Russian Federation interfered in last year's election.

On Friday, The Washington Post reported that a senior White House official was now under investigation as part of a probe over Russian efforts to tilt the elections in Trump's favor.

The newspaper cited unnamed sources familiar with the probe as saying a current top White House official has been identified as a "significant person of interest", without disclosing the name of the person.

Spicer said of the former FBI director: "by grandstanding and politicizing the investigation into Russia's actions, James Comey created unnecessary pressure on our ability to engage and negotiate with Russian Federation".

Britain to arrest criminal behind NHS cyber attack: Home Secretary
NHS Digital said it had made health trusts aware last month of IT protection that could have prevented the damage. "Patients should continue to attend and contact their GP Practice in the usual way".


In a statement in response, White House press secretary Sean Spicer did not deny the report, but said Mr Comey had created "unnecessary pressure" on the US' ability to conduct diplomacy with Russian Federation.

The mainstream media have jumped on the as-yet-anonymous reports as additional fuel for their assertions that Trump ousted Comey for investigating his ties with Russian Federation.

Former FBI director James Comey told associates Trump asked him to shut down an investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Among Trump's senior White House advisers are several former campaign officials, including his son-in-law Jared Kushner, Steve Bannon, Stephen Miller and Kellyanne Conway.

The FBI's investigation has bedeviled the Trump administration, and the president personally.

NPR reports that the hearing will be scheduled for after Memorial Day.

At first, the administration said Trump fired Comey based on the recommendation of the Justice Department, and because of Comey's handling of the FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton past year.

Trump has reacted furiously to the appointment of a special counsel, a prosecutor with wide authority to investigate Russias interference and other potential crimes uncovered.

But he made it clear it was not his intention for Mr Trump or other White House officials to use the document to justify firing Mr Comey, and he drafted it only after Mr Trump told him of his plans to dismiss the Federal Bureau of Investigation director.

The announcement, the latest in the shock-a-day Washington saga, was made by deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

Latest News