United Kingdom leader May strikes tentative deal with Northern Ireland party

Theresa May to ask the Queen if Tories can form a government despite hung parliament

Theresa May’s gamble ends in hung parliament as no party can now get majority

Theresa May is to head a minority Conservative government - propped up by the Democratic Unionists - after her General Election gamble backfired disastrously.

Martin Selmayr, senior aide to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, responded to the resignations by tweeting the word "bauernopfer" - German for the sacrifice of a pawn in chess.

However, the Conservatives lost 12 seats, and fell short of the overall majority they needed, though Ms.

May called the early election when her party was comfortably ahead in the polls, in the hope of increasing her majority and strengthening Britain's hand in exit talks with the EU.

On June 19, the Queen, in traditional state coach and full regalia, will travel from Buckingham Palace to Parliament to unveil the new government's legislative agenda.

An increased majority in the Lower House of Parliament would have given the Tory leader the numbers to pass Brexit-related legislation without much opposition and uncertainty, as was the situation and the tough time faced by then Conservative leader John Major in 1993 when, during the debate on the European Communities Bill, it also turned into a vote of confidence, which he barely escaped unscathed.

It added that "the logic leading to Mrs".

Katie Perrior, a former director of communications at No 10 Downing Street, said she respected May but her office was "pretty dysfunctional" with Timothy and Hill being accused of bullying behaviour.

The arrangement with the DUP will make governing easier, but it makes some Conservatives uneasy.

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But the party is controversial for many of its stances on LGBT rights, abortion and climate change as well as its alleged links with unionist terrorists. She can only realistically govern now with the support of a party from Northern Ireland, which has a rather different approach to Brexit than her.

Meanwhile, Scottish Conservative leader, Ruth Davidson, last night said she had received assurances from Mrs May over gay rights should the Tories do a deal with the DUP.

Ms Davidson told the BBC: "I was fairly straightforward with her (Mrs May) and I told her that there were a number of things that count to me more than the party".

DUP Leader Arlene Foster recently denied the party was homophobic.

"I saw Jeremy Corbyn, he was out with the people and they were all coming".

"Those who want to tear apart the Union that we cherish and benefit from so hugely have been sent a clear and resounding message", she said. "When it becomes a matter for me is when people try to redefine marriage".

Talks between the government and the DUP are due to restart Tuesday after confusion over the weekend whether an outline deal had been reached, but the Northern Irish party is in the driving seat as they know they are May's only option of forming a government.

Newspaper headlines saw her as just clinging on. The most senior ministers stayed in post, while May was forced to bring back into the Cabinet one of her long-term political foes, Michael Gove, to appease an angry Conservative Party. "May fights to remain PM", said the front page of the Daily Telegraph, while the Times of London said: "May stares into the abyss".

But Mr Corbyn said: "I don't think Theresa May and this government have any credibility".

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