UAE wants worldwide monitoring of Qatar

UAE wants worldwide monitoring of Qatar

UAE wants worldwide monitoring of Qatar

The United Arab Emirates hacked web sites in nearby Qatar, prompting the feud among several Gulf states that's almost two months old with no sign of a resolution, The Washington Post reported.

The story quotes unnamed USA sources who believe senior UAE government officials had discussed the planned hacks of the news agency and government social media accounts on 23 May - the day before they occurred.

UAE Ambassador Yousef al-Otaiba denied the report in a statement, saying it was "false", the Post said. "We either reach an agreement and Qatar's behaviour changes, or Qatar makes its own bed and they can move on and we can move with a new relationship". Arab nations including Saudi Arabia and Egypt cut ties with Qatar, accusing it of supporting extremism, in the biggest diplomatic crisis to hit the region in years.

The hacking of Qatari media services in May saw the tiny Gulf state's Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, quoted as praising Hamas and describing Iran as an "Islamic power".

Saudi Arabia and its allies imposed sanctions on Doha on June 5, including closing its only land border, denying Qatar access to their airspace and ordering their citizens back from the emirate.

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Qatar said in late May that hackers had posted fake remarks by the emir, an explanation rejected by Gulf states.

"The Washington Post story is not true, purely not true", he said responding to a question after a speech at Chatham House in London.

It described the alleged hacking as a violation of worldwide law and of agreements between the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) - the regional trade and security group - as well as collective agreements with the Arab League, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation and the United Nations. Doha had previously asked U.S. and British officials to investigate the source of the hack.

"Tillerson's spokesperson has said that [Qatar-Gulf crisis negotiations] may be a long process to find any sort of common ground in resolving this conflict", said Zhou-Castro. Qatar's critics are widely thought to have overreached in their demands, in particular in their insistence the Al Jazeera news network be shut down.

"The information published in the Washington Post on 16 July 2017, which revealed the involvement of the United Arab Emirates. and senior Emirati officials in the hacking of Qatar News Agency, unequivocally proves that this hacking crime took place", a Qatari government statement said.

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