Scaramucci Says Plotters Seeking to 'Eject' President Trump

Scaramucci Says Plotters Seeking to 'Eject' President Trump

Scaramucci Says Plotters Seeking to 'Eject' President Trump

The former communications director also addressed the expletive-laden tirade in which he referred to then-Chief of Staff Reince Priebus as a "f**king paranoid schizophrenic, a paranoiac", and hit out at Steve Bannon, stating "I'm not Steve Bannon".

Trump's response was criticized by politicians on both sides of the aisle for failing to name white supremacist or alt-right groups involved in the protests.

Former White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci said Sunday he believed there were people in the U.S. administration seeking to "eject" President Donald Trump as he does not belong to the political establishment class.

Many Republicans joined in the criticism of Trump, including former presidential aspirants Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz.

Earlier in the day Axios.com portal reported, citing sources close to the president, that US President Donald Trump allegedly suspected that his Chief Strategist Steve Bannon was the one behind the leaks about the latter's White House colleagues. But you've also got this sort of Bannonbart influence in there which I think is a snag on the president.

"Well, obviously, I wish they would give me a bar of soap and tell me to go wash my mouth out in the bathroom and move on", Scaramucci said during the ABC interview.

"I really did get a directive from the president".

Protests Erupt Across the Country Against Violence in Va. White Nationalist Rally
Twenty-year-old James Fields from OH , the alleged driver of the auto , is in detention on suspicion of second-degree murder. Although a few cars were held up by the march, police said the rally was peaceful and there were no arrests.


Scaramucci served in the White House role for only about 10 days.

"I wouldn't have recommended that statement", he said on ABC.

He added, "It's actually terrorism".

Scaramucci's appearance on "This Week" was his first major public interview since being fired last month after launching into a profanity-laced rant on a call with New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza.

"There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy, and neo-Nazis", she tweeted. Much of the loudest praise for Trump's remarks came from white nationalists.

The president has long had a following among white supremacist groups attracted to his nationalist rhetoric on immigration and other hot-button issues. "It has to stop now".

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