Trump's Aust-led council a "joke"

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Trump's Aust-led council a "joke"

Trump, a real estate magnate who had never before held public office, was elected President in November touting his experience in the business world and ability to strike deals.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk resigned from the manufacturing council in June, and two other advisory groups to the president, after the us withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement.

The more than two dozen CEOs who were initially appointed to the council were tapped by Trump shortly after January inauguration with the stated objective of making recommendations to grow the manufacturing sector. "Thank you all!" Trump announced in a tweet on Wednesday.

The New York Times earlier reported the Strategic & Policy forum was in disarray.

After a discussion among a dozen prominent CEOs, the decision was made to abandon the group altogether, said people with knowledge of details of the call.

Schwarzman organized a call on Wednesday for member executives to voice concerns after Trump's comments, and an overwhelming majority backed disbanding the council, two sources said. The manufacturing council was created to promote USA job growth.

Plank, CEO of Under Armour, announced his resignation from the council on Twitter, saying.

Austan Goolsbee, the former chief economist for President Barack Obama, said the departures suggest the president's response to the violence in Charlottesville could alienate those who work for the companies, and those who buy the products and services that they sell. Vice President Mike Pence, who is cutting short a trip to Latin America, told reporters in Chile that "I stand with the President and I stand by those words".

Persimmon boosts profit by a third in H1 2017
Persimmon described the market as "confident" and said that it was looking forward to the autumn sales season. He added: "Our private reservation rate over recent weeks is c. 2 per cent ahead year on year".


The controversial remarks were a final straw for business leaders who accepted advisory roles to Trump in the hopes they could influence his decisions on taxes, regulations and the economy. Trump showed a fondness for loudly calling out companies on Twitter, but most absorbed the punches and promised to hire more people in the US while touting plans to build more factories and other facilities.

Prior to the widespread backlash against Trump's Charlottesville comments, the council was convened without the requisite public disclosures established by the Advisory Committee Act, according to a lawsuit filed by Food and Water Watch, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the safety of food and water supplies.

The demise of the councils raised Wall Street speculation that senior administration figures such as White House economic adviser Gary Cohn or U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin might step down to avoid the tarnish of being associated with Trump.

"Usually, certain niceties are observed to smooth over a rupture", said Galston, who served as a domestic policy aide in the Clinton administration.

McConnell's statement did not mention Trump by name.

But Intel CEO Brian Krzanich was more specific when he resigned a short time later, writing that while he had urged leaders to condemn "white supremacists and their ilk", many in Washington "seem more concerned with attacking anyone who disagrees with them". She did, however, tweet on August 12: "Heartbroken by the violence in Charlottesville".

Trump's remarks on Tuesday were a more vehement reprisal of his initial response to the bloodshed. "And President Trump, instead of condemning the white supremacists, just went out and said, "I condemn all violence from everybody". The country's justice minister accused Trump of trivializing anti-Semitism and racism.

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